Tech Talk

Fix Those Tired Shoes

Last week’s Question of the Week, “Do you do regular maintenance to your bike(s) this time of year?” coincided with some repairs I needed to do. They aren’t on my bicycle, though. They’re on my circa 2008 Specialized S-Works shoes. It got me thinking that the off-season is a great time to catch up on maintenance like this that is super important for riding, yet easily forgotten or ignored since it’s not specifically on the bike. When planning your pre-season mechanical schedule, be sure to include everything related to your cycling.

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RBR Readers' Bicycle Winterizing Tips

In last week’s Tech Talk, I provided five tips for winterizing your bicycle. Perhaps because you’re in the holiday gift-giving mode, six of you then chimed in adding your valuable tips. Thanks for sharing your expertise. Let’s look at your recommendations and I’ll add a few related winterizing stories and tips.

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A 'New' Wheel/Tire Size to Consider?

A recent reader suggestion for a Question of the Week about 650B wheel sizes caught us by surprise because neither publisher John Marsh nor I thought that enough RBR readers would own bikes with 650B wheels – or even necessarily know what a 650B wheel is – to have an interest in the question. But (and this is what we hope sets us apart a little bit), both John and I thought it was an interesting technical topic, because the 650B wheel size goes back to at least the 1940s (mostly popular in Europe) and is finally becoming more common. So, we agreed that it's worth taking a look at.

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Wireless Shifting for Everyone?

Back in early September, a few weeks before cycling’s biggest new product introduction every year at the Interbike International Expo, I wrote, “As we do every fall before the show, John Marsh and I have been predicting what we might see, and a funny thing happened. We both expressed concern that it might be an uninspiring show, like the last couple we’ve attended.” This proved to be the case. While we found plenty to write about, we didn’t spot any game-changing new must-have products. So our interest was piqued by a recent email from Paul Gallagher, inventor of the Xshifter.

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Dealing with a “Loose” Wheel, Part 3

Last week in Part 2 of this series, we covered the basic tools and setup for working on a wheel on which the spokes have lost their tension. This week, we’ll finally commence retensioning and truing the wheel. Let’s get going! Luckily, when wheels lose spoke tension uniformly, the wheels usually stay relatively round and true. So, while the spokes need tightening, you shouldn’t have to worry about fixing major imperfections in the wheel’s trueness. Instead your focus will be on tightening the spokes. As long as you tighten them uniformly, the wheel will remain relatively round and true.

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Dealing with a “Loose” Wheel, Part 2

Last week in Part 1, we learned about Pennsylvania RBR reader Randy’s rear Shimano wheel, which was rubbing the brake pads on each pedal stroke because the spokes had loosened. This week, I’ll explain how anyone with some basic mechanical aptitude can go about fixing a loose wheel like Randy’s. What do I mean by “basic mechanical aptitude?” Essentially, that you’ve diagnosed and fixed enough things on your bicycle or your car or around your home that you have developed the ability to analyze and understand how something works.

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Dealing with a “Loose” Wheel, Part 1

This week’s topic (the first of a 2-parter) evolved from an RBR Premium Member’s email. (We gladly offer our direct, personal advice to our Premium Members.) Randy from Pennsylvania wrote about a fairly common wheel issue: "When I ride out of the saddle on hills, my wheels laterally flex and rub on my brake pads." To introduce the subject, I’ll share his emails and my replies today and next week, and explain how you might be able to fix the problem should you wish to tackle it yourself. 

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Your Additional Chain-Drop and Front Derailleur Issues

As promised in last week’s episode, this Tech Talk covers a few additional chain-drop, chainline and front derailleur issues raised by readers in our Comments section. As a reminder, a few weeks back, in Issue 732 of RBR Newsletter, I wrote about helping a friend diagnose and solve his chain-drop issue. We’ve received some excellent comments on these topics in the weeks since. So, I’ll share a few of the most insightful ones and add a few more tips.

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Paceline-Safety Responsibility Follow-Up

It was great receiving so much feedback to our paceline safety (and whose responsibility is it, anyway?) story last week. Thanks! You raised some interesting points and even made us laugh, with a hilarious Seinfeld snippet on YouTube titled "George and the Pigeons." Worth watching if you missed it. High five to David Pybus for posting that! I’ll respond with a few more thoughts on your comments today. Then, next week, I’ll reply with tips for those who brought up additional chain drop and front derailleur issues, since that’s a hot topic, too.

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More on Chain Drop, Chainline; Paceline-Safety Responsibility

Before we get into this week’s main subject – paceline safety responsibility – I want to share a couple of helpful comments that came in about last week’s column on diagnosing chains that fall of the chainrings. Readers Chuck and Frank added that front derailleur adjustment issues can cause chains to fall off, including a bent derailleur cage and improper limit screw adjustment that lets the derailleur throw the chain one way or the other. Let’s look at these issues: 

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Diagnosing a Chain That Falls Off the Chainring

We’re always on the lookout for interesting problems to share with you in the hopes we can head off trouble before it happens – and/or provide tips for diagnosing and dealing with glitches. The issue for you this week is a drivetrain miscue that came up on my club’s last Saturday ride. We had returned to town and stopped to say our goodbyes, and while still standing over his Trek, one of the guys backpedaled and his chain promptly came off the chainring and jammed in the front derailleur. He said something like, “that always happens and it drives me nuts.”

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Be a Vampire Killer

With all due respect to Roman Polanski’s classic 1967 spoof "The Fearless Vampire Killers," I want you to get in the habit of hunting for, finding and terminating your bicycle vampires. These two-wheel ghouls constantly suck your energy by making your bicycle harder to pedal. And, like the fanged variety, they’re apt to appear at any time and can be hard to find. In fact, it’s rare that you’d ever notice a vampire while riding or even rolling your bike.

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