Issue No. 772 - Since 2001! - August 3, 2017    PDF


Produced every Thursday by RBR Publishing Co. Inc. for roadies around the world. ISSN 1536-4143

Your Weekly Dose of the Best in How-To Road Cycling Info


Bike Maintenance 101, Part 2

By Jim Langley  In Part 1 last week, I told you to round up the few basic tools and supplies needed to maintain your (new, if you’re new to the sport) road bike. But this advice serves as a good reminder to all of us, no matter how old our bikes or how much experience we have. Before we get started on the routine steps to take to keep it running like new, here’s something else important: When you’re not riding your iron horse, keep it inside. This might seem like a no-brainer. But I’m regularly surprised to hear from even somewhat experienced roadies that their bike lives outside.

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RBR Favorites: The Lights We Use

Editor's Note: We continue our regular feature – providing a rundown from RBR Contributors on our favorites across the spectrum of components, nutrition, clothing, accessories, you name it. Today we discuss our lights. (Here's a link to the gamut of RBR Favorites.) We're also planning an upcoming review of the Bontrager Flare R tail light (the favorite of a couple of our contributors), as well as a "roundup" article that will feature some basic info on a number of lights to provide a "selection resource" for anyone in the market for new lights.

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How to be "On Form" for a Big Event

By Coach John Hughes  I would like to do a century ride in about two weeks and have done some moderate base training but not as much as I'd like. I did a 77-mile ride three weeks ago and felt pretty good (average speed 14.5 mph). Did just a few rides in the meantime and rode 70 miles two days ago and did not feel very good (sore butt, wrists, tired quads). My average speed was 14 mph, with around 3,000 feet climbing. I did a hard 65-mile ride five days before, and a 90-minute commute two days prior and a swim the day prior. Now I would like to do a century in less than two weeks, and another century two weeks after that.

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The Kindness of Strangers

Editor's Note: In last week's RBR Newsletter, we ran an article by Stan Purdum titled Days of Adventure on the Bike, in which Stan detailed a self-guided tour where he had some particularly memorable "mis-adventures" – bad days on the bike. He rightly pointed out that good days on the bike far outweigh any bad days, and fellow reader and RBR Premium Member John Yoder wrote in to share one of his most memorable good days, focusing on the kindness of a stranger.

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NSAIDs May Increase Heart Attack Risk

By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  Millions of people take over-the-counter NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) pain medicines when they have a headache, fever, chills, joint pain or various other aches and pains. A recent study shows that NSAIDs are associated with increased risk for heart attacks (British Medical Journal, May 9, 2017). The increased risk begins within the first week to month a person starts taking them. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), diclofenac (Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren-XR, Zipsor, Zorvolex), celecoxib (Celebrex), etodolac (Lodine-discontinued) and other drugs.

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Do Training Rides Need to Be As Long as Events?

By Coach Fred Matheny  I'm 48 and in the past rode 12-15 hours per week but was usually overtrained. This season I'm trying to recover better by doing 10-hour weeks including weekend rides of about 100 miles and building up only for major events.  I'm planning to ride one of Australia's toughest "classics," Grafton-Inverell. It's 140 miles, starting at sea level and ascending to about 4,000 feet, with an 11-mile climb of 7 percent. It'll take me about 8 hours. Do you think I need to do training rides of the same distance? Is an 8-week build-and-peak phase adequate?

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Energy Drinks Can Have Negative Side Effects

By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  Energy drinks can raise blood pressure and may cause irregular heartbeats, according to a recent study conducted at Travis Air Force Base in California (Journal of the American Heart Association, April 26, 2017;6(5)). This extremely well-planned, -performed and -controlled study shows that two hours after drinking 32 ounces (four cups) of a popular energy drink, some of the healthy volunteers developed irregular heartbeats (corrected QT interval) and elevated systolic blood pressure.

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