Issue No. 733 - Since 2001! - October 13, 2016    PDF


Produced every Thursday by RBR Publishing Co. Inc. for roadies around the world. ISSN 1536-4143

Your Weekly Dose of the Best in How-To Road Cycling Info

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More on Chain Drop, Chainline; Paceline-Safety Responsibility

By Jim Langley  Before we get into this week’s main subject – paceline safety responsibility – I want to share a couple of helpful comments that came in about last week’s column on diagnosing chains that fall of the chainrings. Readers Chuck and Frank added that front derailleur adjustment issues can cause chains to fall off, including a bent derailleur cage and improper limit screw adjustment that lets the derailleur throw the chain one way or the other. Let’s look at these issues:

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Best Tips For Handling Long, Steep Climbs

By John Marsh  Day 2 of the Tour de Wyoming in July was the kind of epic climbing day that defines us as roadies. Before the ride, I warily eyeballed the course and elevation map for that day, knowing it would test everything I had as a rider. It was one of my toughest days on the bike ever. But also one of the most rewarding. And, thinking about it and other challenging climbing days in years past, it offered numerous tips and lessons worthy of sharing.

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Aches and Pains III: Why Does My Hand Get Numb, or Hurt?

By Coach John Hughes  In the RBR reader survey a few weeks ago, painful or numb hands was the third most frequent problem cited – afflicting 16% of you as your main physical issue on the bike. (While it may not be main issue for most of us, hand pain or, especially, numbness, happens to almost all of us from time to time.) I have a client, Sam, who had completed a series of brevets (200 km / 125 miles, 300 km / 187 miles, 400 km / 250 miles and 600 km / 375 miles). He developed numbness, also known as cyclist’s palsy, and actually damaged his nerves (neuropathy).

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New eArticle Bundle: Preventing Cycling Ailments!

Preventing Cycling Ailments BundleIn this 4-article series Coach John Hughes provides a wealth of well-researched knowledge and vast experience in how to prevent and deal with some of road cycling's typical ailments: the "troika" of pressure points – issues with your butt, hands & feet; the scourge of cramps; nausea, bonking and other fuel-related maladies related to nutrition; and the power of the mental side to help forestall or overcome these and other on-bike issues. This terrific bundle includes all 4 eArticles (click the links to individual articles for detailed descriptions): Butt, Hands & Feet, Preventing and Treating Cramps, Nutrition for 100K and BeyondGaining a Mental Edge. PREVENTING CYCLING AILMENTS BUNDLEJust $15.96 (Save $4 vs. purchasing individually); $13.57 for Premium Members!

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RolFlex

By Coach Rick Schultz  Upon initial inspection, the RolFlex looks like a fairly complicated contraption with a few too many moving parts. But after reading the included user’s manual and watching the company's YouTube videos, this design really makes a lot of sense. In fact, it made more and more sense the more I used it – so much so that I stopped and re-started this review several times because I discovered yet another exercise and a whole new way of using this very versatile trigger point (TrP) release tool.

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High Cadences, Used Appropriately, Can Save Your Legs

By Coach Fred Matheny  I think I was recently reading that the best cyclists have a cadence of 110 rpm. This seems very fast (at least for me). I am probably in the 70-90 range. Do most riders do better at higher rpm? Is there benefit to sometimes powering up hills at lower rpm? I asked a question earlier in the year about maintaining cycling shape while doing bouts of backpacking. The advice I received was very good. The first ride after getting back is slow and heavy but after that it comes back quickly. Thanks.

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Big Sugar Paid Harvard to Say that Sugar is Healthful

By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  My faith in several of my Harvard mentors during the 1950s and 1960s has been shattered by an article that appeared this week in JAMA Internal Medicine (September 12, 2016). Cristin E. Kearns, a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, discovered letters in the archives at Harvard, the University of Illinois and other libraries showing that from the 1960s onward, the sugar industry paid respected researchers at Harvard to write that sugar is not harmful.

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