Nutrition

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  • 12 Myths About Hydration

    Proper management of hydration and electrolytes is important in both hot and temperate conditions. Scientists are learning more and more about hydration, electrolytes and sports hydration management. It's becoming clear that much of what we were taught in years past is outdated – yet numerous myths about hydration persist. Here are an even dozen: 

  • 12 Myths About Hydration

    By Coach John Hughes  Proper management of hydration and electrolytes is important in both hot and temperate conditions. Scientists are learning more and more about hydration, electrolytes and sports hydration management. It's becoming clear that much of what we were taught in years past is outdated – yet numerous myths about hydration persist. Here are an even dozen:

  • 60% More Pounds Pedaled Off in 2015!

    For the third year since my eBook Pedal Off The Pounds was published by RBR, the Des Moines Cycle Club once again conducted our own Pedal Off The Pounds (POTP) program this summer, with (again) astonishing results. Last year’s results were reported in a previous issue of RBR Newsletter under the title How to Lose 583 Pounds. We wondered how we could ever top that total; but we blew it away this year!

  • 60% More Pounds Pedaled Off in 2015!

    For the third year since my eBook Pedal Off The Pounds was published by RBR, the Des Moines Cycle Club once again conducted our own Pedal Off The Pounds (POTP) program this summer, with (again) astonishing results. Last year’s results were reported in a previous issue of RBR Newsletter under the title How to Lose 583 Pounds. We wondered how we could ever top that total; but we blew it away this year!

  • A Bowl of Goodness from an Aspiring Pro

    I was approached a while back by the Axeon Cycling Team about covering the team in some way. I asked if the team could somehow provide some insight into training or nutrition that might be of use to RBR’s audience. Axeon’s Tao Geoghegan Hart, a 20-year-old Londoner, was happy to provide his favorite post-ride recipe. Tao’s in the midst of a stellar 2015 season, including finishing 7th overall at the USA Pro Challenge (1st in the Youth classification), 13th overall at the Tour of Utah (3rd in the Youth), and 13th overall at the Tour of California (2nd in Youth).

  • A Bowl of Goodness from an Aspiring Pro

    I was approached a while back by the Axeon Cycling Team about covering the team in some way. I asked if the team could somehow provide some insight into training or nutrition that might be of use to RBR’s audience. Axeon’s Tao Geoghegan Hart, a 20-year-old Londoner, was happy to provide his favorite post-ride recipe. Tao’s in the midst of a stellar 2015 season, including finishing 7th overall at the USA Pro Challenge (1st in the Youth classification), 13th overall at the Tour of Utah (3rd in the Youth), and 13th overall at the Tour of California (2nd in Youth).

  • A Bowl of Goodness from an Aspiring Pro

    I was approached a while back by the Axeon Cycling Team about covering the team in some way. I asked if the team could somehow provide some insight into training or nutrition that might be of use to RBR’s audience. Axeon’s Tao Geoghegan Hart, a 20-year-old Londoner, was happy to provide his favorite post-ride recipe. Tao’s in the midst of a stellar 2015 season, including finishing 7th overall at the USA Pro Challenge (1st in the Youth classification), 13th overall at the Tour of Utah (3rd in the Youth), and 13th overall at the Tour of California (2nd in Youth).


    Editor’s Note:  And now for something completely different. I was approached a while back by the Axeon Cycling Team about covering the team in some way.

    Founded in 2009 by former Belgian pro Axel Merckx, Axeon is a sort of “team in training” for aspiring pro riders. The team is known for taking in young talent (all the riders are age 18-22) and helping them “develop into the athletes they were meant to be.” The team, in its various incarnations over the years, boasts a long list of notable alumni, including Taylor Phinney, Lawson Craddock, Joe Dombrowski, Ben King and Jasper Stuyven, among others.

    I turned the tables on the PR rep who contacted me and asked if the team could somehow provide some insight into training or nutrition that might be of use to RBR’s audience. After some initial consideration, however, I tabled the training idea as bit too “out there” for most of us rec riders.

    My thoughts turned to trying to play video games against my teenage sons. I’m just hopelessly incapable of keeping up with them at even the basest level. I thought that same dynamic might apply re: the training regimen of a 20-year-old aspiring pro cyclist!

    So I shifted to the one commonality that doesn’t change with age: The need to refuel after a ride. Axeon’s Tao Geoghegan Hart, a 20-year-old Londoner, was happy to provide his favorite post-ride recipe. Tao’s in the midst of a stellar 2015 season, including finishing 7th overall at the USA Pro Challenge (1st in the Youth classification), 13th overall at the Tour of Utah (3rd in the Youth), and 13th overall at the Tour of California (2nd in Youth). He’s currently competing in the Tour of Britain.

    Our thanks to Axeon and Tao! And best of luck to Tao and the team for the rest of 2015 and beyond.

    --- John Marsh


    Bowl of Goodness

    By Tao Geoghegan Hart

    Post-ride can be a lazy and lethargic time. From extensive field research, I have found that the best post-ride meals often come from one frying pan. This is a dish I would use on an easier day when I haven't done a ton on the bike. It has plenty of protein to recover and provide satiety, along with some good fat and nutrients. Plus, it tastes pretty damn good, I think! I generally use quite a bit of seasoning and often some spice to keep my dishes interesting and stimulating.

    Ingredients:

    2 Rashes (slices) Bacon

    Half Avocado

    2 Eggs

    Mixed Leaves (greens)

    Olive Oil

    Hummus

    Sunflower Kernels

    Sprinkling of Oregano

    Sprinkling of Basil

    Black Pepper

    Salt

    Paprika

    Preparation and Cooking:

    Cut Bacon into bite-size pieces, heat non-stick pan with a couple dashes of Olive Oil to medium heat. Cut Avocado up into small pieces. Throw in Bacon and cook until about half-way to crispy, adding the Avocado shortly after the Bacon. Get the seasoning on to your ingredients around this time, before shortly after breaking your two eggs in to the pan. Let them fry for a handful of seconds, before mixing it all up. Use a little care in order not to mush your bacon. I find an under-and-flip method works best here. As your eggs are scrambling up, lay some salad in a bowl.

    Once eggs are at desired scramble, empty the contents of your pan onto the salad. Throw some Sunflower seeds on top and get a dollop of Hummus on the side. Paprika is always a nice addition to Hummus, along with another dash of Olive Oil across the dish.

    Finally, get some Black Pepper and Sea Salt on top of the dish, get your pan in the sink and dig in!

  • A Cautionary Tale: How Cycling Saved My Life

    My eBook Pedal Off The Pounds (POTP) is filled with tips on healthy eating. While the eBook if focused on eating for weight loss, most of the suggestions are designed for healthy living as well, including heart health. When I wrote the book, I based it on the diet that I have come to eat and live by. I walk the talk. It has helped me stay lean as I have gotten older. And I was hoping it would keep me free of the diseases of civilization: cancer, diabetes and heart disease. So I was shocked recently to learn that I had a blocked coronary artery!

  • A Cautionary Tale: How Cycling Saved My Life

    By Coach David Ertl  My eBook Pedal Off The Pounds (POTP) is filled with tips on healthy eating. While the eBook if focused on eating for weight loss, most of the suggestions are designed for healthy living as well, including heart health. When I wrote the book, I based it on the diet that I have come to eat and live by. I walk the talk. It has helped me stay lean as I have gotten older. And I was hoping it would keep me free of the diseases of civilization: cancer, diabetes and heart disease. So I was shocked recently to learn that I had a blocked coronary artery!

  • Am I Drinking Too Much on Rides?

    Question: I'm careful to keep myself hydrated. I drink two large bottles every 30 miles, using both water and sports drink. On a 50-mile ride, I refill both bottles, making up a new batch of sweet stuff with a pre-measured amount of powder. I ride with a friend who drinks about the same amount I do. However, I urinate about four times during a 50-mile ride, while my friend doesn't go at all. Am I consuming too much fluid? -- Joe K.

  • Are Extra Vitamins Helpful for Cyclists?

    Question: I'm 58 and try to stay fit through proper eating and vitamins. But all the claims and hype are confusing. After I take all my supplements, I often wonder if there will be room for breakfast! They're costly, too. What's your recommendation for a reasonable regimen of vitamins for guys our age? -- Ron M.

  • Aspirin's Benefits from Plants

    A few weeks ago I reviewed data explaining why most doctors now recommend that heart attack-susceptible men and women, aged 50 to 69, take a baby aspirin daily or every other day to help prevent heart attacks and colon cancer, prompting more than 50 million Americans to take aspirin regularly. However, people who take low-dose aspirin regularly are at 58 percent increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding and 27 percent increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke, and these risks increase with aging (Ann Intern Med, June 21, 2016;164(12):826-35).

  • Aspirin's Benefits from Plants

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  A few weeks ago I reviewed data explaining why most doctors now recommend that heart attack-susceptible men and women, aged 50 to 69, take a baby aspirin daily or every other day to help prevent heart attacks and colon cancer, prompting more than 50 million Americans to take aspirin regularly. However, people who take low-dose aspirin regularly are at 58 percent increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding and 27 percent increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke, and these risks increase with aging (Ann Intern Med, June 21, 2016;164(12):826-35).

  • Belly Fat Causes Diabetes, Heart Attacks

    Abdominal obesity comes from high blood insulin levels. To prevent blood sugar levels from rising too high after you eat, your pancreas releases insulin, which converts blood sugar to a type of fat called triglyceride. Insulin drives triglycerides into the fat cells in your belly. So having high triglycerides and a fat belly are signs of high blood insulin levels, and high blood levels of insulin constrict arteries to cause heart attacks.

  • Big Sugar Paid Harvard to Say that Sugar is Healthful

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  My faith in several of my Harvard mentors during the 1950s and 1960s has been shattered by an article that appeared this week in JAMA Internal Medicine (September 12, 2016). Cristin E. Kearns, a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, discovered letters in the archives at Harvard, the University of Illinois and other libraries showing that from the 1960s onward, the sugar industry paid respected researchers at Harvard to write that sugar is not harmful.

  • Big Sugar Paid Harvard to Say that Sugar is Healthful

    My faith in several of my Harvard mentors during the 1950s and 1960s has been shattered by an article that appeared this week in JAMA Internal Medicine (September 12, 2016). Cristin E. Kearns, a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, discovered letters in the archives at Harvard, the University of Illinois and other libraries showing that from the 1960s onward, the sugar industry paid respected researchers at Harvard to write that sugar is not harmful.

  • Caffeine Boosts Endurance and Strength

    A review of 34 recent studies shows that taking caffeine before and during exercise can increase muscle strength and endurance (European Journal of Nutrition, published online October 18, 2016;1-15). Taking 1-2 mg of caffeine per pound of body weight can enhance performance of athletes. A 150-pound athlete will get maximum benefit from two to three cups of strong coffee, which has about 100mg of caffeine per cup.

  • Caffeine Boosts Endurance and Strength

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  A review of 34 recent studies shows that taking caffeine before and during exercise can increase muscle strength and endurance (European Journal of Nutrition, published online October 18, 2016;1-15). Taking 1-2 mg of caffeine per pound of body weight can enhance performance of athletes. A 150-pound athlete will get maximum benefit from two to three cups of strong coffee, which has about 100mg of caffeine per cup.

  • Can Bonking Be a Good Thing?

    Question: Last Saturday I was riding over the Colorado National Monument near Grand Junction and seriously lost energy on the return trip. I knew I was bonking, but instead of taking a gel or energy bar I decided to gut it out. I figured that because all of my available sugar had been consumed and my body was running out of fuel, maybe I would start burning fat for energy and lose some weight. Is there any truth to this theory? -- Dave W.

  • Can Pedaling Style Cause Calf Cramps?

    I'm a 39-year-old former competitive athlete, still in decent shape from speed- and power-oriented sports. I'm also new to cycling. My progress is being stalled by calf cramps, and I've been told that it's because I "ankle" too much when I pedal. Is that straining my calves? 

  • CLIF Organic Energy Food

    Clif Organic, Pizza Margherita.web I got a package recently that was most intriguing. It wasn’t just another variation on a theme, but rather an outside-the-box approach from CLIF. The line is called CLIF Organic Energy Food, and each package is certified USDA organic, and gluten free. They’re designed to be consumed during activity, much like a gel, with a screw cap on top and a wide-straw-like opening from which to sip or slurp the product.

  • Convert White Fat Cells into Fat-Burning Brown Fat Cells

    In the United States since the end of World War II, there has been an increasing epidemic of obesity and diabetes. This month Dr. Alexander Pfeifer, of the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Bonn in Germany, showed that mice can lose a lot of weight just by converting their harmful white fat cells into energy-consuming brown-fat cells (Cell Reports, January 3, 2017;18:225–236). We will await further research to see if this concept can be applied to humans.

     

  • Convert White Fat Cells Into Fat-Burning Brown Fat Cells

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  In the United States since the end of World War II, there has been an increasing epidemic of obesity and diabetes. This month Dr. Alexander Pfeifer, of the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Bonn in Germany, showed that mice can lose a lot of weight just by converting their harmful white fat cells into energy-consuming brown-fat cells (Cell Reports, January 3, 2017;18:225–236). We will await further research to see if this concept can be applied to humans.

  • Cramping: A Case Study - The Perfect Storm, Part 1

    By Coach John Hughes  RBR Premium Member Tom D. recently e-mailed us an excellent set of questions on cramping based on his own ongoing issues with cramps. His experience and the myriad issues surrounding the prevention and treatment of cramps led me to write a 2-part series of articles in response. Part 1 discusses Tom's problems, which are common to many roadies, and what scientists know about cramps. Part 2, next week, will discuss the role of supplements and other ways of preventing cramps.

  • Cramping: A Case Study - The Perfect Storm, Part 1

    RBR Premium Member Tom D. recently e-mailed us an excellent set of questions on cramping based on his own ongoing issues with cramps. His experience and the myriad issues surrounding the prevention and treatment of cramps led me to write a 2-part series of articles in response. Part 1 discusses Tom's problems, which are common to many roadies, and what scientists know about cramps. Part 2, next week, will discuss the role of supplements and other ways of preventing cramps.

  • Cramping: A Case Study - The Perfect Storm, Part 2

    RBR Premium Member Tom D. recently e-mailed us an excellent set of questions on cramping based on his own ongoing issues with cramps. His experience and the myriad issues surrounding the prevention and treatment of cramps led me to write a 2-part series of articles in response. Part 1, last week, discusses Tom's problems, which are common to many roadies, and what scientists know about cramps. Part 2, this week, discusses the role of supplements and other ways of preventing cramps.

  • Cramping: A Case Study - The Perfect Storm, Part 2

    By Coach John Hughes  RBR Premium Member Tom D. recently e-mailed us an excellent set of questions on cramping based on his own ongoing issues with cramps. His experience and the myriad issues surrounding the prevention and treatment of cramps led me to write a 2-part series of articles in response. Part 1, last week, discusses Tom's problems, which are common to many roadies, and what scientists know about cramps. Part 2, this week, discusses the role of supplements and other ways of preventing cramps.

  • Do You Have an Endurance Ride Planned this Summer?

    Just seven weeks ago RBR Premium Member Michael Povman asked us for advice on how to train for a 300K (187 miles). His longest ride to date had been an 80-miler. Coach John Hughes provided him with detailed recommendations in an Ask the Coach column: How Should I Best Train for a 300K? On Sunday, Michael wrote Coach Hughes to let him know that he successfully completed his 300K:

  • Do You Need Vitamin Pills?

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  North Americans almost never suffer from vitamin deficiencies, except for vitamin D, yet more than 50 percent of the population spends more than $30 billion each year for vitamin pills and other nutritional supplements that they do not need. Forty-five percent of those who take vitamin pills believe that they will improve their health, but we have no good evidence that they do (JAMA Internal Medicine, Feb. 4, 2013).

  • Do You Need Vitamin Pills?

    North Americans almost never suffer from vitamin deficiencies, except for vitamin D, yet more than 50 percent of the population spends more than $30 billion each year for vitamin pills and other nutritional supplements that they do not need. Forty-five percent of those who take vitamin pills believe that they will improve their health, but we have no good evidence that they do (JAMA Internal Medicine, Feb. 4, 2013).

  • Does 'Bonk Training' Work?

    Question: I'm 52 years old, overweight and diabetic due to lack of exercise and high body fat. I got into cycling and I love it! I want to lose weight, and a friend recommended "bonk training." That is, don't eat breakfast and ride till I bonk. He says my body will suck fat like crazy and get slim. Is this bogus or does it work? -- Walter F.

  • Don't Count Calories

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  Contestants on the television program The Biggest Loser dropped an average of 129 pounds, yet six years later, most have regained more than 70 percent of their lost weight, largely because dieting decreased their ability to burn calories. They now burn about 500 fewer calories each day than would be expected for a person of the same age and weight (Obesity, published online May 2, 2016). We have known for many years that the commercial weight loss programs do not work. The $2.5 billion weight loss industry has a terrible one-year-weight-loss record.

  • Don't Count Calories

    Contestants on the television program The Biggest Loser dropped an average of 129 pounds, yet six years later, most have regained more than 70 percent of their lost weight, largely because dieting decreased their ability to burn calories. They now burn about 500 fewer calories each day than would be expected for a person of the same age and weight (Obesity, published online May 2, 2016). We have known for many years that the commercial weight loss programs do not work. The $2.5 billion weight loss industry has a terrible one-year-weight-loss record.

  • Eat Carbohydrates During Competition, Not Fat

    Muscles use carbohydrates and fat (and a very small amount of protein) stored in the body as fuel during exercise. You have enough fat stored in your body to keep you moving for days. However, you will start to run out of stored sugar in your body when you exercise all-out for more than 70 minutes. The more intensely you exercise, the greater the percentage of sugar that your muscles use for energy. When you are moving slowly, your muscles get almost all of their energy from fat. When you exercise as hard as you can, your muscles get almost 100 percent of their energy from sugar. 

  • Eat Carbohydrates While Riding, Not Fat

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  Muscles use carbohydrates and fat (and a very small amount of protein) stored in the body as fuel during exercise. You have enough fat stored in your body to keep you moving for days. However, you will start to run out of stored sugar when you exercise all-out for more than 70 minutes. The more intensely you exercise, the greater the percentage of sugar that your muscles use for energy. When you are moving slowly, your muscles get almost all of their energy from fat. When you exercise as hard as you can, your muscles get almost 100 percent of their energy from sugar.

  • Eat Whole Grains, Not Flour

    Whole grains are healthful, while refined grains (foods made from flour) can be harmful, particularly if you are overweight or have high blood sugar levels. A recent review of 20 studies, with 2,282,603 participants and 191,979 deaths during the study periods, found that greater intake of whole grains was significantly associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (Adv Nutr, November 2016;7:1052-1065). Each additional three servings of whole grains per day was associated with a 25 percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Many other studies agree with these findings:

  • Eat Whole Grains, Not Flour

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  Whole grains are healthful, while refined grains (foods made from flour) can be harmful, particularly if you are overweight or have high blood sugar levels. A recent review of 20 studies, with 2,282,603 participants and 191,979 deaths during the study periods, found that greater intake of whole grains was significantly associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (Adv Nutr, November 2016;7:1052-1065). Each additional three servings of whole grains per day was associated with a 25 percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Many other studies agree with these findings:

  • Eating and Drinking to Improve Endurance Performance, Part 2

    Eating and drinking just before your race: The best time to take sugar to help you prolong your intense exercise is 30 minutes or less before you start. Taking a sugar load more than 30 minutes before competition can cause a high rise in blood sugar which, in turn, causes your pancreas to release huge amounts of insulin. Then you start your race with high insulin levels that, combined with your muscle suddenly pulling large amounts of sugar from your bloodstream, can cause low blood sugar levels that can make you feel exhausted even though you have just started your race.

  • Eating and Drinking to Improve Endurance Performance, Part 2

    Editor’s Note:Last week and this week we’re featuring a 2-part column from Dr. Gabe Mirkin covering what to do, and what not to do, to help improve performance on endurance rides or events. Last week’s article debunked carbo loading, and this week’s continues with what and how best to eat just before, during, and after an endurance event, what minerals you need during the event, and whether to restrict sugar during intense exercise. Enjoy!

  • Eating During, After Intense Workouts Makes Better Athletes

    Eating during and after long, intense workouts helps competitive bicycle racers recover faster from their workouts and therefore helps to make them stronger and faster. It is the intense workout that makes you stronger and faster, so the more rapidly you recover from an intense workout, the sooner you can take your next intense workout, and the more improvement you will gain. If you want to improve your athletic ability to become faster and stronger and to have more endurance, you need to train in a program of stress-and-recover.

  • Eating During, After Intense Workouts Makes Better Athletes

    Eating during and after long, intense workouts helps competitive bicycle racers recover faster from their workouts and therefore helps to make them stronger and faster. It is the intense workout that makes you stronger and faster, so the more rapidly you recover from an intense workout, the sooner you can take your next intense workout, and the more improvement you will gain. If you want to improve your athletic ability to become faster and stronger and to have more endurance, you need to train in a program of stress-and-recover.

  • Eating Like an Olympian (Roadie), Part 2

    In last week’s column, Eating Like an Olympian, Part 1, I described in general how an Olympic athlete eats and drinks. More specifically, what can we learn from how they eat daily? How should a regular roadie eat every day? Here is a sample nutrition plan for a 150-pound roadie assuming a 90-minute ride at 15 mph with about 1,000 feet of climbing, 30 minutes of core and stretching and the remaining 22 hours are spent doing light office-type work, eating, relaxing or sleeping.

  • Eating Like an Olympian (Roadie), Part 2

    By Coach John Hughes  In last week’s column, Eating Like an Olympian, Part 1, I described in general how an Olympic athlete eats and drinks. More specifically, what can we learn from how they eat daily? How should a regular roadie eat every day? Here is a sample nutrition plan for a 150-pound roadie assuming a 90-minute ride at 15 mph with about 1,000 feet of climbing, 30 minutes of core and stretching and the remaining 22 hours are spent doing light office-type work, eating, relaxing or sleeping.

  • Eating Like an Olympian, Part 1

    What did riders in the pelotons of the Olympic road races eat each day to support their training and racing? Personalized to the individual athlete is the key recommendation. According to British dietitian Gabrielle Maston, “A lot of athletes [at the Olympics] are on stringent nutrition programs and they do have dietitians on board,” to meet this recommendation. (Daily Mail Monday, Aug 8th 2016) Most recreational roadies can improve both your riding, and your health, by following a few simple recommendations. No pills, supplements or sports nutrition are necessary!

  • Eating Like an Olympian, Part 1

    By Coach John Hughes  What did riders in the pelotons of the Olympic road races eat each day to support their training and racing? Personalized to the individual athlete is the key recommendation. According to British dietitian Gabrielle Maston, “A lot of athletes [at the Olympics] are on stringent nutrition programs and they do have dietitians on board,” to meet this recommendation. (Daily Mail Monday, Aug 8th 2016) Most recreational roadies can improve both your riding, and your health, by following a few simple recommendations. No pills, supplements or sports nutrition are necessary!

  • Eating While Riding: Is Sugar a Bad Thing?

    By Coach John Hughes  Spring is beautiful in Colorado! The hills are green from the early spring snowfalls and the lakes are full from runoff from the mountain snowpack. Last week I rode up to Carter Lake and back, a 3:30 jaunt that included exploring a dirt road variation. At the lake I kicked back at the marina, drank a Coke (not diet), ate a half-dozen fig bars and soaked in the sun and the beauty. On the way I’d eaten a banana, apple slices, a granola bar and drank a bottle of tea sweetened with white sugar, and a bottle of water. Over the course of the 3:30 ride I ate almost all carbs, much of it in sugary foods and drink.

  • Eating While Riding: Is Sugar Bad?

    Spring is beautiful in Colorado! The hills are green from the early spring snowfalls and the lakes are full from runoff from the mountain snowpack. Last week I rode up to Carter Lake and back, a 3:30 jaunt that included exploring a dirt road variation. At the lake I kicked back at the marina, drank a Coke (not diet), ate a half-dozen fig bars and soaked in the sun and the beauty. On the way I’d eaten a banana, apple slices, a granola bar and drank a bottle of tea sweetened with white sugar, and a bottle of water. Over the course of the 3:30 ride I ate almost all carbs, much of it in sugary foods and drink. 

  • Eggs: New Review of Studies

    By Gabe Mirkin, M.D.  Nobody really knows whether or not eating eggs is safe. We have studies showing that people who eat more than five eggs a week have increased risk for diabetes and breast and colon cancer, but the studies show only that eating eggs is associated with these conditions. We have no studies that show that eggs cause disease in humans.

  • Eggs: New Review of Studies

    Nobody really knows whether or not eating eggs is safe. We have studies showing that people who eat more than five eggs a week have increased risk for diabetes and breast and colon cancer, but the studies show only that eating eggs is associated with these conditions. We have no studies that show that eggs cause disease in humans.

  • Fit for Life V: 105 Isn’t Old!

    Robert Marchand, a 105-year-old cyclist, set a world record by riding 22.547 km (14 miles) in one hour on January 4. He rode on the track of the Velodrome National, a state-of-the-art venue used to host the elite of track cycling in Saint-Quentin-En-Yvelines, France. The simple wisdom of how Robert Marchand lives his life holds lessons for all of us as we age, across a number of areas. He does have some genetic advantages, but in many respects, it's what he does every day, and every week, that account for his remarkable longevity and continued achievement:

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